Diversity DNA Toolkit

Identify strengths, weakness and gaps in diversity and inclusion plans

Overview

Boardwalk’s Diversity DNA Toolkit quickly and accurately identifies gaps in diversity and inclusion plans. Clients undergo a probing virtual audit where questions are asked to pinpoint what’s currently going on in your organisation. Responses are analysed and bench marked against our unique index, providing external validation for the results. We will work with you to identify areas of prioritisation and determine next steps to build an effective diversity and inclusion plan. The Boardwalk team will review development on a 3, 6 and 12-month time frame, monitoring progress against set goals.

This two-stage solution works across different levels in an organisation to build greater accountability in advancing the diversity and inclusion agenda. The DNA Toolkit can also be used to consistently measure progress across various functions within an organisation.

Suitable for

  • Diversity and Inclusion leads, HR leads and steering groups
  • Senior leaders responsible for strategic planning
  • Function leads

Outcomes

  • Identifies important gaps in current diversity and inclusion activity
  • Provides seven key areas of focus against an external benchmark of best practice
  • Maps out specific diversity and inclusion priorities with clear measurable outcomes
  • Gives you regular reviews to monitor progress and keep work on track
  • Enables clearer decision-making on programmes and budgets

Organisational benefits

  • Clearer ROI on diversity and inclusion plans
  • Tangible goals in place to build more inclusive cultures
  • Plans that support the recruitment, development and promotion of diverse talent

Chat with one of our team members to discuss what Boardwalk Leadership can do for you

Latest insights

Why Lego is on the top of my wish list

A recent study published in American Scientific in September showed children as young as 6 years old subconsciously make decisions about careers based on their gender and the role models around them. Why should we be worried? Because it shows all the work targeting 11year olds to consider STEM subjects and possible career paths come in that bit too late.